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has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen, i value this place deeply. it's very, very important. your participation is urged because it's a good thing and for an additional reason, that my vocal chords may fail sometimes but i'm going to go for it, and let's hope i can keep on talking. the two days -- no. i want to add one more thing about the archives. john said it, and it's true. people like me, who want to research american history, are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i, and my research assistants, including josh is
that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a horse since the day he got here. and thanks to carlin's leadership, thanks to marvin pinkert who he calls the genius behind the development of the new space, all of us as citizens can far better experience our history. as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen i value this place deeply. it's ve
johnson if he heard bobby kennedy something critical of president johnson through king. in other words, this was hoover's job was basically to ingratiate himself with johnson to punish bobby kennedy, whom she didn't like and to punish king whenever he could. c-span: by the way, did you listen to the johnson takes? >> guest: yes. that's a whole -- c-span: so you could hear all of those? >> guest: you can hear those. the john thune defeat could johnson tapes were wonderful. they corroborate a lot of what's in a declassified meetings on vietnam and in some of the files, but there's no substitute for actually hearing the tapes. and i quote from a number of them here. c-span: what is the trilogy? >> guest: the trilogy? c-span: money, loyalty, sex. >> guest: money, loyalty -- that became the short hand once bobby -- once dr. king became aware as i said, juneau, a lot of times they thought the thing store being done to them, a hostile things that were being done to them by the police were being done by segregation molest police force, but once they became aware that is the fbi, they had these
dictionaries at that time. the samuel johnson had not picked them up. he saw the language of the street as part of what was part of language. so there was this democratic background. as it goes along there are things that for example jefferson creates which are hysterical. he comes up with twisted vacation which sounds like something that george bush would come up with. [laughter] but there are some wonderful things and of course probably on the seedier side and i am relying on the oxford english dictionary to tell you this but they have popular verb to shag is credited to thomas jefferson and one of his diaries. does not appear in any slang dictionary for another 30 years. again i am using the be-all and end-all for there early nailing down when the word was created. austin powers -- you can tell by the way that i have a lot of smart -- the other challenge was looking at how this progress then you can look at your residence and see who really was clever. clever. who was reportedly clever and who is the smartest. along the way there was president johnson first president johnson was the first on
johnson readily be barry goldwater and richard nixon overwhelming george mcgovern. in each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public. and the winner had the advantage of the weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term, landslide, because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a heated battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country with the winner walking off with the modest majority. it is a customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president, or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term, versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger? it's easy to point to the national security, or the economic consequences, or consequent impact on the ratin
, who was really clever and remarkable and who is really smart. president johnson, the first president johnson, he is the first one to come up with discrimination. the first time it was ever used in the distinction between race and religion and etc. so by giving it a name and it's starting to have its own life. i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934, roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. the president would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and it was called the state of the union. a lot of these terms were sort of created by presidents -- we think they are from day one. in fact, they are ones that have been added later. and again, some of them are just wonderful. just jumping to a couple, zachary taylor created the term first lady. he applied it to dolly madison but it was the first that anyone had ever used that term. the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was jumping around a little bit and woodrow wilson had potomac fever, which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned was woodrow wilson, watchful waiti
at that time. the samuel johnson had not picked them up. he saw the language of of the street as part of what was part of language. so this -- there was this sort of democratic background of this thing. and as it goes along, there are things that, for example, jefferson creates which are hysterical. i mean, he comes up with twistification which sounds like something that george bush would come up with. [laughter] but there's some just wonderful things. and, of course b, his -- preble on the seedier side -- probably on the seedier side, and i'm relying on the oxford english dictionary to tell you this, but the cop la story verb to shag is credited to thomas jefferson in one of his diaries. and it does not appear in the any slang dictionary for another 30 years. and this, again, i'm using the be all and end all for sort of early nailing down when a word was created, so austin powers did not create the word "shag," it was thomas jefferson. [laughter] you can tell, by the way, that i have a lot of fun doing this. the other challenge was just looking at how this progressed. you can look at differe
behind and handed it to president johnson and president johnson read it. he didn't show it to bob mcnamara and bob mcnamara called from the library and it has been declassified. he was screaming from the other room why didn't i see this memo? they concluded that it was the six so he didn't see it. and it would not have made a difference if he had seen it. >> the memo concluded the united states position in the world would not be affected if it lost the war. that was a very important point. there were other things in the memo that were not quite right. it was an interesting memo. was really written before they could know what was going on. we could take one more question. >> any advice for the new cia director? >> i do have. i always have an opinion. he should learn to be quiet. if you remember -- i hope you will send the frame back to the pentagon, if you remember, after the osama bin laden capture, he came out of the white house, you remember that? you were probably third. i hope you will be more circumspect. in every part of the agency, he knows it well but i am hoping. my perso
? >> caller: this is tim johnson in palm desert. reyna when we speak of hispanic politics or hispanic culture in general, of course, the elephant in the living room is the age-old social and economic status that characterized his spannic culture with the legions of those at the bottom and a few landing patrons at the top. how do you see this playing out in hispanic politics of our day? >> guest: you know, i think that we're living in a point right now here in the country where people with becoming more aware of the latino presence, and the importance steps that latinos are playing right now, especially in politics, you know, the latino vote very important in getting obama re-elected, and now, you know, the event that the republican party, it seems, that they really do need to change their thinking with latinos, and the issue important to us like immigration. i am very excited about, you know, the way the country is looking at latinos and to realize that, you know, we are an important part of the society. we need to work hard to create immigration reform to help those here to definitely move u
to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt, lyndon johnson, texas. richmond nixon, california. gerald ford, was not elected. so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he
. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actually enacted into law. >> of a point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> i became aware of them when i was in the graduate program university. asked if i work on a project. >> sixty's, 70's. >> yes. i used some of the reports because the reports they did were very good reports. some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally by the time the commission as to me since i've do legal and constitutional history file would read something of a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out and what the history had been all the way back to england and so on. i did a report for them. >> what is your history? >> i'm from tennessee. nash fell. my family and their relatives are all still there. i went to a pro high-school. i went to howard university. then i went to the university of michigan. first the history department where i got a ph.d. then i went to law s
. a briefcase came in from the white house from president johnson full of papers. region have a diplomatic couriers in the. is it you go. we drove to the night. i said the back from one to kept chipping the rest. i get down there in the morning in the one was there except helicopters flying over all of the cows and goats going completely out of the mind. they're running around like crazy, just berserk for fear of the helicopters. the people stand around not knowing what to do it themselves . where is the american ambassador? oprah's he is down the coast. on the beach, and that is where the ambassador was supposed to be. so i said, let's go down there. we went. and just as i got there, just as i got there the ambassador came striding out of the hotel wearing nothing but a bathing suit and a bathing cap. and i tried to stop the ambassador. somehow give him the briefcase. i did not know the combination. it did give me the combination. the head of security was down there. did you relieved me of the briefcase. i said, what's going on. the investor is going to walk into the mediterranean to prov
, and there are two chapters on this. the johnson administration used the fairness doctrine to target some political enemies, one of the people i interviewed in year in addition to a number of us, mark fowler, the reagan chairman who helped dismantle the fairness doctrine. once you have that regulation of the way it allowed people like rush limbaugh to get a foothold in. that led to a real explosion of conservative, unleash. >> that was going to be my follow-up question. from 1920 to today, the predominant voices, was there a pattern? left right left? >> interesting enough, one of the things i write about in this book is out during the new deal you have a major metropolitan daily to the right.
9, 2004, when johnson, from ken lawrence frank came out with a book called urban sprawl and public health. but the book did this person technical epidemiological meet on the sociological bones we've been arguing about. here's why cities can save us. by far, the greatest aspect of the epidemic river health challenges is the obesity epidemic. not that obesity itself is the problem, that illnesses the city of these two. diabetes now consumes 2% of our gross national product. a child born after to test and has a one in three chance in america of becoming a diabetic. now look at the first generation of american going to live shorter lives than their parents. that's not a huge surprise to you. we've all been talking about the wonders of the point where they started in the 40-ounce service people are drinking. only recently has the argument -- have cities and then comparing diet and physical inactivity. one was called gluttony versus slot. another doctor at the mayo clinic for patients in electronic underwear and measured every motion chemists at a regime, said it that way, started counti
and harass, the johnson targeted political enemies. one of the people i interview in here, mark faller. reagan's ftc chairman who helped dismantle the fairness doctrine. once you had that regulation out of the way it i allowed people like rush limbaugh to get a foothold in and that led to an explosion of consecutive and partisan voices on both sides, mostly on the conservative side. >> host: that was my followup question in regards to from 1920 to today. the predominant-for- -- was there a pattern, left, right, left? >> guest: well, interestingly enough of. one of the things i write about is during the new deal you had the major metropolitan dailies leaping the right. very antifdr, and most of the radio and broadcasting voices were very pro new deal, very pro fdr. kind of have the opposite today. and -- it became sort of a domain for the right, and the late 80s, with rush limbaugh, got his national show in 1988, and then drew from there during the clinton administration, that is one of the best things that happened for talk radio in the sense that it gave lots of material and continued
broadcasting industry and two chapters on this. one is challenging iraq when the johnson administration used the third doctrine to target political enemies. one of the people i interviewed in here, i interviewed mark fowler, reagan's chairman who helped dismantle the fairness doctrine. once you had the regulation out of the way and allow people like rush limbaugh to get a foothold in and that led to a real explosion of conservative -- mostly on the conservative side. >> that was my follow-up question in regards from 1920 to today the predominant voices, was there pattern that when left right left? >> interesting enough one of the things i write about in this book is how during the new deal you had a major metropolitan dailies lean to the right. they were very anti fdr and most of the radiobroadcasting voices, talk radio were very pro new deal, kind of the opposite today. mostly became sort of domain for the right and the late 80s with russia limbaugh, his national show in 1988 and the group from there, in the clinton administration, one of the best things that happened for talk-radio, gave l
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)